Five Watersheds Project

Enriching Five Watersheds

Rehabilitating and Restoring Unique Landscapes
Within Five Nova Scotia Watersheds Along the Bay of Fundy

The “Five Watersheds Project”, is a multi-year Coastal Restoration Fund Project – a program component of the multi-year Oceans Protection Plan (OPP), of the Government of Canada.

The five-year project will address issues of coastal erosion and physical barriers to fish passage in the (1) Chiganois, (2) Debert, (3) Folly, (4) Great Village, and (5) Portapique Watersheds (the Watersheds), within the Cobequid Bay of the Inner Bay of Fundy in Nova Scotia. From that information, the Project will identify areas of habitat concern and create a restoration plan with a focus to ameliorate fish passage barriers caused by aboiteaux and erosion.

Four of the five watersheds within the scope of the project area are identified as critical habitat for the endangered Inner Bay of Fundy, (IBoF) Atlantic Salmon which contain the remaining native IBoF Atlantic Salmon populations. Through physical reconnaissance and surveys, planning, engineering and community support; this project will help to restore fish habitat by enhancing coastal entry points and removing obstructions from migration routes for IBoF Atlantic Salmon. The project will assess and propose innovative solutions for aboiteaux replacement on the Chiganois River. Through these actions, the project will help contribute to the recovery of the endangered IBoF Atlantic Salmon.

Rehabilitating and Restoring Unique Landscapes Flyer

Download Flyer (PDF)

Rehabilitating and Restoring Unique Landscapes Newsletter

October Newsletter 2018 (PDF)

Chelsey Whalen
Project Manager

Chelsey Whalen

Chelsey Whalen

Chelsey Whalen – originally from Toronto, Ontario, moved to Halifax, Nova Scotia with family when she was a child. Chelsey has always loved animals, and her dream was to have a small hobby farm! Chelsey and her boyfriend Steven, now live in Shubenacadie, Nova Scotia on a farm and raise chicks, and have laying hens, along with their three dogs. When Chelsey is home, she is always outside gardening, exploring nature, playing soccer, bird watching or by the water.

Chelsey graduated from Dalhousie University Faculty of Agriculture with a degree in Animal Science in 2016. Knowing she wanted to pursue a career in wildlife conservation, she went on to complete the Wildlife Conservation Technology Program at Holland College, in Prince Edward Island. She is especially interested in wildlife conservation, and is excited to be working on the Five Watersheds Project, and being involved with the recovery of the Inner Bay of Fundy Atlantic Salmon. At Holland College, she performed many different surveys for Parks Canada, focused on identifying wildlife, including fresh and salt water fish, birds and plant species. Chelsey has a broad past work experience, including working with wildlife rehabilitation, working with dairy and sheep at the Ruminant Animal Center at the Dal AC, and as a lab technician at the Canadian Blood Services.

Contact Chelsey Whalen

Email: cwhalen@mapcorg.ca
Phone: 902.895.6899
37 Forrester Street
Truro, Nova Scotia B2N 4B4
Canada

Abby MacLeod
Project Administrator

Abby MacLeod

Abby MacLeod

Abby Macleod has received postsecondary education in “International Development”, and “Office Administration”, along with experience in the corporate finance sector. A busy mom of four-year-old twin girls Jade and Lilah; Abby still finds time to explore the outdoors, visit farmer’s markets, and enjoy the library with her daughters.

Abby is passionate about global development, and racial justice, and is outspoken on issues including systemic and environmental racism, and decolonization. Abby considers herself a humanist, and strives to understand the socioeconomic impacts of racial inequity.

Combining her education, work experience and passions, Abby was hired as the Project Administrator for the “Five Watersheds Project”.

Contact Abby MacLeod

Email: amacleod@mapcorg.ca
Phone: 902.895.6899
37 Forrester Street
Truro, Nova Scotia B2N 4B4
Canada